Two's company..ten's definitely a crowd!

Two's company..ten's definitely a crowd!

Two's company..ten's definitely a crowd!

First published in News by

All In Good Time movie Director Nigel Cole has revealed he interviewed Asian couples and asked them about their personal sex lives as research for the film.

He was speaking too Asian Image at the launch of the comedy which looks at how two newly-weds can’t consummate the marriage because of repeated interruptions from the wider family.

The film is based in Bolton and is set to become one of the hits of the summer.

It stars Amara Karan as Vina and Reece Ritchie as Atul and is a story adapted for the big screen from the award winning play Rafta Rafta by Ayub Khan Din (East is East.) When the couple’s honeymoon is cancelled the day after the wedding, the newlyweds have no choice but to return to the Atul’s household.

And that is when they realise that things aren’t really going to go to plan. No matter how hard they try a series of interruptions, none more by dad Eshan (played by the hilarious Harish Patel) make it almost impossible for the couple get some private time.

Director Nigel Cole told us, “I was concerned that the pressure on a young couple and the what it might affect their sex life.

“It was tough so I came up here on research to find eight or nine newly married Asian couple. I was here for a week. I took them to a coffee and asked them about their sex life!

“It was embarrassing and difficult thing to do. The scene where the couple go to the hotel came from my conversations. One person told me that he couldn’t take his wife home and had to take her to a hotel.”

The movie is sure to be a hit with many Asian young couples who will be able to relate to the situation Vina and Atul find themselves in.

Amara said, “I think the audience is living through the frustration of the couple. When it comes at the end (excuse the pun!) it is so satisfying.”

The film was part-filmed in Bolton. “Most of the movie was shot in a studio. But then we came up to Bolton to get a feel for the place. It was worthwhile trip as we found out more about the accent among other things.”

Unlike most movies when the wedding is the culmination of the story, here the wedding is at the beginning.

Reece said, “The excitement is based on how these guys are going to survive after the wedding.

“The wedding scene is great but it quite surreal. When they walk through the door of the family home is when they are faced with the reality of their situation.”

Amara said, “The adaptation is wonderful in that it's in an Indian family, and it’s set in the present day. There are so many similarities between the socially conservative element of Indian immigrant families and the 1960s English family”.

More in the latest issue of Asian Image.

‘All in Good Time’ is released on May 11 nationwide.

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